Tuesday, February 7, 2017

Seller/Buyer Etiquette

I haven't sold a horse (besides Lily, who was taken by the first person who tried her) in literal years. Like maybe ten full years. Back then it was a project horse I worked with and my trainer did all the dirty work for me regarding contacting sellers and setting up appointments, so this is one aspect of horse ownership I am actually incredibly not familiar with.

So of course, who do I ask?

THE INTERNET!

Specifically bloggers, because thats my favorite avenue for help when I am in need.



I know I have been pushing/advertising him terribly, which isn't conducive to getting him sold by March, but I can only do so much when I'm not riding. Now that I am healthy again and can ride everyday its another story, but I felt bad advertising a horse for sale who actually wasn't really in work.

My level of advertising
However, I do have THREE people interested in him and two are coming to see him this weekend. One of them is scheduled to come out in March (she lives out of state), which is of course kind of far but whatever works.

My question is, do I tell them ahead of time that there are others coming to look at him or do I say it afterwards like, "Just let me know your decision as soon as possible, I have two others interested and would like to keep them updated"?

I need help. I don't want to fuck it up/create drama where its not needed.

Regardless, he's been a total gem of a chesnugget and its simultaneously making me so so happy and incredibly sad. I will miss him. It still doesn't seem real that (hopefully) he won't be mine for much longer.

He really floored me the other day when we rode inside due to frozen outdoor and the lighting technician guy was there fixing the lights. He had his motorized ladder thing and was making a total racket. I decided to ride anyways because he needs to desensitization and advised the guy to ignore any antics. He told me that most people were completely unable to ride while he was in there and apologized in advance for ruining my ride.

I tossed B on the lunge just to let him look at it for a minute and I shit you not he barely even batted at eye.

none given

This is huge guys.

I think a year ago he totally would have lost him damn mind and made it impossible to focus. But yesterday we had a gorgeous ride full of beautiful transitions, 10m circles and flying changes. He hasn't even touched the standing in about a week, so I can probably take that off completely for now. I was jazzed.



Knowing he's finally a solid equine citizen makes this process a little easier, but still. This definitely sucks.

17 comments:

  1. I would definitely let the interested parties know that there are other people coming to look at him, just so everyone is on the same page. IMO, I don't think it matters whether you say something before or after, but just making sure they're aware and being up front is the best thing you can do :)

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  2. I say absolutely tell them there are other people looking at him. First thing, it creates an demand for him in the buyers mind, they need to make a decision sooner vs later. Then it will discourage a lowball offer if they are actually interested. Then it will prevent angry buyers if buyer B comes along and agrees to purchase on-the-spot and buyer A then decides they want him as well. Good luck in selling him by March, even though we know you don't really want to.

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    1. lol it won't happen. My bank account is going to cry blood

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  3. I haven't sold horses, but I sell houses for a living, and my advice is to be honest and up front with everyone. No one likes to feel like information was kept from them, or like a seller neglected to mention another interested party in order to manipulate a buyer. I don't think the timing matters as far as before/after they try him, but DO be 100% honest with all prospective buyers!

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  4. I would tell them ahead of time, that way they might be a little more prepared to make a quicker decision. I have done both and I think either is fine, but I think the main thing is to make sure they know how you're going to accept offers. If the second or third people that look at him offer to buy him first will you accept it before hearing if the first people want to buy him? Or will you wait to hear back from the first people before making a decision on who gets to buy him? I usually tell people that I will take the first offer, even if it's the third person to look at my horse, but if I think the second offer is a better home, then I will go with them. "I reserve the right to make a decision on the best home for my horse" is usually in my ad to make that clear to buyers since I have had people threaten to sue me since they had some self-proclaimed "first right of refusal" that was NOT offered to them. Good luck!!

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  5. I've never sold a horse, but as a buyer I appreciate honesty.

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  6. Definitely let them know. I'm in the midst of this now - I have TWO people who want to take this horse on trial which obviously can't happen, so the family got to have a powwow about what sort of home they'd like to see him in. They were lucky on that front.

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  7. Nope, I actually wouldn't tell them unless their appointment conflicts with someone else or if they specifically ask. It can be seen as a tactic to put pressure on a buyer to make a decision asap, a decision they might ultimately regret.

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    1. Hit enter too soon. Except in the case of out of state buyers who need more time and money to coordinate their visit. That person I would be upfront with because they may feel negatively in the end.

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  8. I agree with L. To me, telling them there are others interested seems like you're trying to force them to come to a conclusion quickly. No one likes to be rushed into a difficult decision. As with everything I sell, it's a first come first serve kinda deal. First person to offer to buy, provided it's a good home, gets the horse. If he's being advertised, chances are other people are looking at him. Anyone looking to buy a horse already knows this.

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  9. I would be honest with potential buyers that there are multiple interested parties, because that way they have all the available information.

    When I was shopping for Penn, the seller was very up front that there were other people looking. As a buyer, I had mixed feelings about being told there are other people coming to see him- I was thinking, "Am I being pressured to buy? Or does he really have a list of people coming to see him?" But I think if you're looking for a quality horse or one in the right price range, you should expect the horse to have multiple people come to see him. He checked enough of my boxes that I made a point to see him before anyone else did- so being told there were other people interested up front was helpful in that regard (everyone was told first come, first serve). But then again, I messaged the seller at 8pm on Saturday asking if I could come the next day to see him (he checked a ton of boxes and price and I was very serious). I felt no pressure to buy him now because of other people- I just wanted first crack at the option of buying him.

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    1. I also did the out of state thing- Penn was 5 hours away. If you want to see the horse bad enough, you make time to see him. I was lucky my schedule was flexible enough that I got to see him within 24 hours of him arriving at the sale barn. Must have been the lady's fastest sale ever.

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  10. Don't you think that if they are following your blog they will know! ;-)

    I bought and sold horses, I prefer full disclosure. You can wait for all buyers to see him, before agreing for a sale.

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    1. Of course I thought of that and I don't care, more just trying to mitigate drama on the back end. It's not a secret, just not sure how to state it

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  11. I think the only one you really owe any disclosure to is the out of state, cause it would suck to pay for a ticket out and have the horse sold. I went through a lot of people flaking til the last minute to disclose things when I shopped last, and trying to sell a horse now, I am pretty honest about what I am offering with those I know are far away. People who live close, I mostly just say come try, because really, horses ride different for different people. This time of year sucks to sell a horse, at least out here. If two come on same day then disclosure is nice in case they bump into each other.

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  12. What Alli & Dino said. I felt like I got burned when I was horse shopping a couple of years ago. The horse I wanted was like a 2 hour drive (through LA traffic) to see. I can't remember if I went 2 or 3 times, but the last visit I was told as I was getting out of my car that someone had already made an offer on him. The owner wasn't there--I just thought that was dirty. Like I was used in the event the offer fell through. Why couldn't they have let me know before I traipsed across Southern California? "Hey, just wanted to let you know we have an offer we are going to accept pending the buyer's vet's PPE being clean. Please feel free to come ride him again." This is the same seller who was offended when I asked if it was possible to do a trial. In her words trials were only for $$$$$ horses. What.Ever.

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  13. I'm sorry to hear you have to sell him, especially when he's being so good!
    As for the selling aspect... In my limited experience, I have seen other sellers/buyers appreciate when kept in the loop as direct/straightforward as possible. Like: "FYI, three other potential buyers are riding him this week." Rather than: "Hey so I know you just rode him but like I'm really trying to get rid of him ASAP and there might be other people interested so..."

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